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Research Methodology

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Apr 30, 2010

1.1 Meaning of Research
Research in common parlance refers to a search for knowledge. One can also define research as a scientific and systematic search for pertinent information on a specific topic. In fact, research is an art of scientific investigation. The Advanced Learner's Dictionary of Current English lays down the meaning of research as "a careful investigation or inquiry especially through search for new facts in any branch of knowledge."' Redman and Mory define research as a "systematized effort to new knowledge." Some people consider research as a movement, a movement from the known to the unknown.
 
It is actually a voyage of discovery. We all possess the vital instinct of inquisitiveness for, when the unknown confronts us, we wonder and our inquisitiveness makes us probe and attain full and fuller understanding of the unknown. This inquisitiveness is the mother of all knowledge and the method, which man employs for obtaining the knowledge of whatever the unknown, can be named as research.
 
Research is an academic activity and as such the term should be used in a technical sense.
According to Clifford Woody research comprises defining and redefining problems, formulating
hypothesis
or suggested solutions; collecting, organizing and evaluating data; making deductions and
reaching conclusions; and at last carefully testing the conclusions to determine whether they fit the
formulating hypothesis. D. Slesinger and M. Stephenson in the Encyclopedia of Social Sciences
define
research as "the manipulation of things, concepts or symbols for the purpose of generalizing to
correct or verify knowledge, whether that knowledge aids in construction of theory or in the
practiceof an art."' Research is, thus, an original contribution to the existing stock of knowledge
making for its advancement.
 
1.2 Research methodology
Research methodologyis a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. In it we study the various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying his research problem along with the logic behind them. It is necessary for the researcher to know not only the research methods/techniques but also the methodology. Researchers not only need to know how to develop certain indices or tests, how to calculate the mean, the mode, the median or the standard deviation or chi-square, how to apply particular research techniques, but they also need to know which of these methods or techniques, are relevant and which are not, and what would they mean and indicate and why. Researchers also need to understand the assumptions underlying various techniques and they need to know the criteria by which they can decide that certain techniques and procedures will be applicable to certain problems and others will not. All this means that it is necessary for the researcher to design his methodology for his problem as the same may differ from problem to problem. For example, an architect, who designs a building, has to consciously evaluate the basis of his decisions, i.e., he has to evaluate why and on what basis he selects particular size, number and location of doors, windows and ventilators, uses particular materials and not others and the like. Similarly, in research the scientist has to expose the research decisions to evaluation before they are implemented. He has to specify very clearly and precisely what decisions he selects and why he selects them so that they can be evaluated by others also.
From what has been stated above, we can say that research methodology has many dimensions and research methods do constitute a part of the research methodology. The scope of research methodology is wider than that of research methods. Thus, when we talk of research methodology we not only talk of the research methods but also consider the logic behind the methods we use in the context of our research study and explain why we are using a particular method or technique and why we are not using others so that research results are capable of being evaluated either by the researcher himself or by others. Why a research study has been undertaken, how the research problem has been defined, in what way and why the hypothesis has been formulated, what data have been collected and what particular method has been adopted, why particular technique of analyzing data has been used and a host of similar other questions are usually answered when we talk of research methodology concerning a research problem or study.
Decision-making may not be a part of research, but research certainly facilitates the decisions of the policy maker. Government has also to chalk out programmes for dealing with all facets of the country'sexistence and most of these will be related directly or indirectly to economic conditions. The plight ofcultivators, the problems of big and small business and industry, working conditions, trade unionactivities, the problems of distribution, even the size and nature of defense services are mattersrequiring research. Thus, research is considered necessary with regard to the allocation of nation'sresources. Another area in government, where research is necessary, is collecting information on theeconomic and social structure of the nation. Such information indicates what is happening in theeconomy and what changes are taking place.
The decision to be made in the current research work is whether or not the organizational culture affects the alignment of IT strategy with the business strategy of a firm. Decision making is not the part of research method and process in the subject research. Through the research we aim to gather relevant and pertinent data to enable us to make appropriate decisions based on the past data. Various parameters that constitute the organizational culture will be first established and validated and the research work shall start.
 
1.                        TYPES OF RESEARCH
 
The basic types of research are as follows:
1.1    Descriptive vs. Analytical
Descriptive research includes surveys and fact-finding enquiriesof different kinds. The major purpose of descriptive research is description of the state of affairs as it exists at present. In social science and business research we quite often the termEx post facto research for descriptive research studies. The main characteristicof this method is that the researcher has no control over the variables; he can only reportwhat has happened or what is happening. Mostex post facto research projects are usedfor descriptive studies in which the researcher seeks to measure such items as, for example,frequency of shopping, preferences of people, or similar data.Ex post facto studies alsoinclude attempts by researchers to discover causes even when they cannot control the variables. The methods of research utilized in descriptive research are survey methods of all kinds, including comparative and correlational methods. Inanalytical research, on theother hand, the researcher has to use facts or information already available, and analyzethese to make a critical evaluation of the material.
 
2.2 Applied vs. Fundamental
 Research can either be applied (or action) research orfundamental (to basic or pure) research. Applied research aims at finding a solution for animmediate problem facing a society or an industrial/business organization,whereas, fundamental research is mainly concerned with generalizations and with the formulation of a theory. “Gathering knowledge for knowledge's sake is termed 'pure' or 'basic' research”. Research concerning some natural phenomenon or relating to pure mathematics are examples offundamental research. Similarly, research studies, concerning human behavior carried onwith a view to make generalizations about human behavior, are also examples offundamental research, but research aimed at certain conclusions (say, a solution) facing aconcrete social or business problem is an example of applied research. Research to identify social, economic or political trends that may affect a particular institution or the copy research (research to find out whether certain communications will be read and understood) or the marketing research or evaluation research are examples of applied research. Thus, thecentral aim of applied research is to discover a solution for some pressing practical problem,whereas basic research is directed towards finding information that has a broad base ofapplications and thus, adds to the already existing organized body of scientific knowledge.
 
2.3 Quantitative vs. Qualitative
Quantitative research is based on the measurement of quantity or amount. It is applicable to phenomena that can be expressed in terms of quantity. Qualitative research, on the other hand, is concerned with qualitative phenomenon, i.e., phenomena relating to or involving quality or kind. For instance, when we are interested in-.investigating the reasons for human behavior (i.e., why people think or do certain things),we quite often talk of 'Motivation Research', an important type of qualitative research.This type of research aims at discovering the underlying motives and desires, using in depthinterviews for the purpose. Other techniques of such research are word association tests, sentence completion tests, story completion tests and similar other projective techniques. Attitude or opinion research i.e., research designed to find out how people feel or whatthey think about a particular subject or institution is also qualitative research. Qualitativeresearch is especially important in the behavioral sciences where the aim is to discover theunderlying motives of human behavior.
 
2.4 Conceptual vs. Empirical
Conceptual research is that related to some abstract idea(s) or theory. It is generally used by philosophers and thinkers to develop new concepts or to reinterpret existing ones. On the other hand, empirical research relies on experience or observation alone, often without due regard for system and theory. It is data-based research, coming up with conclusions which are capable of being verified by observation or experiment. We can also call it as experimental type of research. In such a research it is necessary to get at facts firsthand, at their source, and actively to go about doing certain things to stimulate the production of desired information. In such a research, the researcher must first provide himself with a working hypothesis or guess as to the probable results. He then works to get enough facts (data) to prove or disprove his hypothesis. He then sets up experimental designs which he thinks will manipulate the persons or the materials concerned so as to bring forth the desired information. Such research is thus characterised by the experimenter's control over the variables under study and his deliberate manipulation of one of them to study its effects. Empirical research is appropriate when proof is sought that certain variables affect other variables in some way. Evidence gathered through experiments or empirical studies is today considered to be the most powerful support possible for a given hypothesis.